Free NAPLEX Practice Questions – Can You Pass the Test?

Here’s the 10 free NAPLEX practice questions that I created:

BE SURE TO SCROLL TO THE BOTTOM TO SEE THE ANSWERS!

Answer the following 3 questions based on the case presented: 38 year old female is coming in to pick up her husband’s prescription. Her husband’s current medication list includes: Acetaminophen, Labetolol, Sertraline, Omeprazole, Flomax, Levothyroxine, and Proscar. His current diagnoses include osteoarthritis, hypertension, BPH, depression, hypothyroidism, and Psoriasis (which he is currently not taking anything). She states that her husband is having trouble with sinus congestion and has started to take pseudoephedrine to help relieve the symptoms.

  1. Which disease state would most likely be exacerbated by pseudoephedrine?
    • Psoriasis
    • BPH
    • Depression
    • Hypothyroidism

2.  Upon further discussion with this patient, you discover that she may be pregnant. Which medication should you counsel her on that she should avoid touching broken or crushed pills?

    • Labetolol
    • Acetamionophen
    • Flomax
    • Proscar

3.  What is the primary mechanism of action for Flomax?

    • Blocks Beta receptors
    • Blocks Alpha receptors
    • Blocks muscarinic receptors
    • 5-alpha reductase inhibitor

4.  An ICU patient with a history of diabetes is currently experiencing significant hyperglycemia. Her current labs reveal creatinine = 1.2, potassium = 3.5, sodium = 134, LFT’s = Within normal limits, and BNP is stable. Which lab would you most closely monitor with aggressive insulin therapy?

  • Potassium
  • Sodium
  • BNP
  • Creatinine

5.  77 year old male with a history of CHF, anxiety, atrial fibrillation, GERD, gout, and CKD is receiving the current medications. Aspirin, Ativan, Zantac, Digoxin, allopurinol, and metoprolol – Which medication would be least likely to be affected by changes in kidney function?

  • Ativan
  • Zantac
  • Digoxin
  • Allopurinol

Answer question 6 and 7 based on the following information: A patient and her mother brings in a prescription for treatment of some congestion/upper respiratory symptoms. The patient is 12 years old and weighs 74 pounds. The prescription is written for 8mg/kg of Ibuprofen per dose, guaifenesin 100 mg per dose, and 5% alcohol. QS AD 240 mls. Take 1 teaspoon by mouth three times daily as needed.

6.  How much alcohol USP do you need to fill the prescription?

Fill In the Blank_______________

7.  How much Ibuprofen do you need to fill the entire prescription? Round to the nearest thousand.

Fill in the Blank_______________

8.  What is the primary mechanism of action of Glyset?

    • Stimulates Beta Cells to produce insulin and causes a decrease in blood sugar
    • Increases peripheral uptake of glucose into muscle cells resulting in a reduction of hyperglycemia
    • Increases hepatic reuptake of glucose resulting in lower blood sugar
    • Inhibits alpha glucosidase and reduces postprandial hyperglycemia

9.  Which of the following would be an appropriate treatment for H. Pylori?

    • Omeprazole, Oral Vancomycin, Metronidazole
    • Protonix, Omeprazole, High Dose Amoxicillin
    • Prilosec, Macrobid, Clarithromycin
    • Omeprazole, Amoxicillin, Clarithromycin

10.  65 year old male with a history of CHF, hypertension, and diabetes is having higher blood pressure of late. His current medications include: Clonidine, Acetaminophen, and Baby Aspirin. Which is the most appropriate medication to initiate?

  • Altace
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Norvasc
  • Inderal

 

Looking for more NAPLEX content like this at a price much less expensive than the Pre-NAPLEX?  Please check out the 185 question practice exam, a great resource for anyone planning on taking the NAPLEX soon!

 

ANSWERS:

Answer the following 3 questions based on the case presented: 38 year old female is coming in to pick up her husband’s prescription. Her husband’s current medication list includes: Acetaminophen, Labetolol, Sertraline, Omeprazole, Flomax, Levothyroxine, and Proscar. His current diagnoses include osteoarthritis, hypertension, BPH, depression, hypothyroidism, and Psoriasis (which he is currently not taking anything. She states that her husband is having trouble with sinus congestion and has started to take pseudoephedrine to help relieve the symptoms.

  1. Which disease state would most likely be exacerbated by pseudoephedrine?
    • Psoriasis
    • BPH
    • Depression
    • Hypothyroidism

Answer: Remember that Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) has alpha agonist activity which can contribute to problems in BPH and hypertension. (hint – remember that alpha blockers are used to treat BPH symptoms as well as hypertension)

2.  Upon further discussion with this patient, you discover that she may be pregnant. Which medication should you counsel her on that she should avoid touching broken or crushed pills?

    • Labetolol
    • Acetamionophen
    • Flomax
    • Proscar

Answer – Proscar and Avodart are two 5 alpha reductase inhibitors that can cause serious birth defects. Finasteride is also used for hair loss.

3.  What is the primary mechanism of action for Flomax?

    • Blocks Beta receptors
    • Blocks Alpha receptors
    • Blocks muscarinic receptors
    • 5-alpha reductase inhibitor

Flomax is an alpha blocker or antagonist used in the treatment of BPH.

4.  An ICU patient with a history of diabetes is currently experiencing significant hyperglycemia. Her current labs reveal creatinine = 1.2, potassium = 3.5, sodium = 134, LFT’s = Within normal limits, and BNP is stable. Which lab would you most closely monitor with aggressive insulin therapy?

  • Potassium
  • Sodium
  • BNP
  • Creatinine

Answer – We need to be very careful with insulin therapy and make sure potassium stores are adequate. Insulin can cause hypokalemia.

5.  77 year old male with a history of CHF, anxiety, atrial fibrillation, GERD, gout, and CKD is receiving the current medications. Aspirin, Ativan, Zantac, Digoxin, allopurinol, and metoprolol.  Which medication would be least likely to be affected by changes in kidney function?

  • Ativan
  • Zantac
  • Digoxin
  • Allopurinol

Ativan is the only medication of the ones listed that is not primarily eliminated by the kidney. The others could accumulate and cause issues with worsening renal function.

Answer question 6 and 7 based on the following information: A patient and her mother brings in a prescription for treatment of some congestion/upper respiratory symptoms. The patient is 12 years old and weighs 74 pounds. The prescription is written for 8mg/kg of Ibuprofen per dose, guaifenesin 100 mg per dose, and 5% alcohol. QS AD 240 mls. Take 1 teaspoon by mouth three times daily as needed.

6.  How much alcohol USP do you need to fill the prescription?

Fill In the Blank_______________

5% is 5mls of pure ETOH per 100 mls

5 X (240mls/100mls) = 12 mls of pure ETOH – Remember that Alcohol USP is 95% ethanol. The final answer will be 12 mls/0.95 = 12.63 mls of alcohol USP

7.  How much Ibuprofen do you need to fill the entire prescription? Round to the nearest thousand.

Fill in the Blank_______________

Take weight in kg – 33.5658kg X 8mg/kg = 268.5 mg per dose.

Each dose is 5 mls and within 240 mls, there is 48 doses.

48 doses X 268.5mg = 12,888 mg of Ibuprofen or rounding to the nearest thousand, 13,000mg

8.  What is the primary mechanism of action of Glyset?

    • Stimulates Beta Cells to produce insulin and causes a decrease in blood sugar
    • Increases peripheral uptake of glucose into muscle cells resulting in a reduction of hyperglycemia
    • Increases hepatic reuptake of glucose resulting in lower blood sugar
    • Inhibits alpha glucosidase and reduces postprandial hyperglycemia

Alpha glucosidase is in the gut and essential breaks down sugars, by inhibiting this enzyme, you reduce absorption of glucose. The major side effect of GI complaints also makes sense (flatulence etc.) as there is more sugar in the gut.

9.  Which of the following would be an appropriate treatment for H. Pylori?

    • Omeprazole, Oral Vancomycin, Metronidazole
    • Protonix, Omeprazole, High Dose Amoxicillin
    • Prilosec, Macrobid, Clarithromycin
    • Omeprazole, Amoxicillin, Clarithromycin

Flagyl (metronidazole) can be used as well, but not with oral vancomycin. Two PPI’s doesn’t make much sense, and macrobid isn’t an appropriate selection for H Pylori.

10.  65 year old male with a history of CHF, hypertension, and diabetes is having higher blood pressure of late. His current medications include: Clonidine, Acetaminophen, and Baby Aspirin. Which is the most appropriate recommendation?

  • Altace
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Norvasc
  • Inderal

Altace (Ramipril) would be most appropriate given his comorbid conditions. A beta blocker could be a consideration with CHF history, but you would not pick a non-selective agent like Inderal first line in this case.

Checkout the 185 question NAPLEX Prep Exam!

8 Comments

  1. Yusuf Wangawalla

    Greetings mate,
    Your updates and Q & A are very enlightening indeed. Keep up the good work.
    I am a Pharmacist in Tanzania. I am not very conversant with some of the brand names.
    I request you to please identify the generic or INN name of the medicines to make life easier and reading your posts even more exciting for guys like me.
    E.g glyset ( ?? ) you mentioned is an alpha glucosidase inhibitor.
    Once again, thank you and great job.

    Reply
    • Eric Christianson

      Thanks for the comment! I specifically designed these questions to give PharmD candidates taking the NAPLEX a free assessment. The NAPLEX exam has both common brand and generic names. I will do my best to try to use generic names in my posts in the future…no promises, but I will try to pay attention a little bit more to the international audience…thanks for the feedback, I’m always open to constructive comments! Take care, Eric

      Reply
      • Assefa

        I am a pharmacy graduate from ethiopia living in Texas , planning to take the naplex exam…My question is what is the major composition of the exam, is it almost pharmacotherapy and pharmacology or it includes every course that we took like anatomy , physiology and others???

        Reply
  2. Marwa Rustam

    Hi,
    I am pharmacist practicing in Montreal, Quebec.
    I am planning to apply for the Naplex exam, I would like you to advice me , from wich books ,i have to study to pass the exam.
    Thanking your co-operation.

    Reply
    • Eric Christianson

      I have a few items available to help you. My naplex nuggets book on Amazon, and a couple of practice exams – they can be found here https://www.meded101.com/pharmacist-board-certification-study-material/

      Many students rely on RXprep which is a comprehensive guide, but can be overwhelming for some students. Hope that helps and best wishes on the journey! – Eric

      Reply
  3. jamshiya

    hi ,I’m trying to get pebc exam . can u seggest me appropriate study books?

    Reply
    • Eric Christianson

      I don’t have anything for that exam at this time. I do believe that NAPLEX All Access Pass would be helpful, but I can’t state directly how it would relate to the PEBC as it was specifically created for the NAPLEX. Thanks for the question!

      Reply

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Written By Eric Christianson

May 3, 2015

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